An English for Research Publication Purposes Course: Gains, Challenges, and Perceptions

Keywords: Academic writing, English for research publication purposes, genre-based teaching,, strategies for writing, peer feedback

Abstract

Academic writing for scholars wanting to publish in English has gained considerable research attention in academic writing circles. This article reports the findings of a case study on the gains, challenges, and perceptions about writing in English that a group of scholars had while taking an academic writing course. Two questionnaires, an in-depth interview, and a teacher-researcher’s journal were used for data collection. The findings emphasize gains emerging from genre-based pedagogy as a holistic approach to academic writing and usefulness of teaching strategies for writing. The study reports time, discipline, and language proficiency as challenges to overcome. Finally, the participants report differing views towards peer feedback and a predominantly positive perception of English as the language for scientific writing.

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Author Biography

Frank Giraldo, Universidad de Caldas, Colombia

is a professor in the Foreign Languages Department at Universidad de Caldas, Colombia. His interests include language testing and assessment, language assessment literacy, language curriculum development, and language teacher professional development.

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Published
2019-06-21
How to Cite
Giraldo, F. (2019). An English for Research Publication Purposes Course: Gains, Challenges, and Perceptions. GiST Education and Learning Research Journal, 18, 198-219. https://doi.org/10.26817/16925777.454